1900 Buganda Agreement Terms

Assuming that the territory of the Kingdom of Uganda, which consists within the borders mentioned in the agreement, amounts to 19,600 square miles, it is divided into the following proportions: unlike the treaties of 1893 and 1894, the Ugandan convention of 1900 included clear borders of the Kingdom of Uganda, a land ownership system and a tax policy. [3] The agreement was negotiated by Alfred Tucker, Bishop of Uganda,[5] and signed among others by Mr. Katikiro Apollo Kagwa, on behalf of Kabaka (Daudi Cwa II), then a young child, and Sir Harry Johnston on behalf of the British colonial government. The Uganda Agreement, 1900 (Siehe Native Agreement and Native Laws, Laws of the Done in English and Luganda at Mengo, in the Kingdom of Uganda, on the 10th March 1900. On Tuesday, March 10, the 120th anniversary of the kingdom of Buganda, under kabaka (king) Daudi Chwa, jumped to bed with the British. The signing of the agreement not only took away the rights of the kingdom, but paved the way for the tutelage and plundering of other parts of Uganda. The agreement anchored British rule in Buganda and also gave the Baganda the opportunity to extend their influence to other parts of the country. Territories that were not under the kingdoms were taken over by Buganda`s neocolonial agents such as Semei Kakungulu. The Kingdom of Uganda is subject to the same customs rules, Porter Regulations, etc., which can be introduced with Her Majesty`s agreement for the Ugandan protectorate in general, which can be described as external taxation in one sense, but no other internal taxation, with the exception of the shelter tax, is imposed on the indigenous peoples of Uganda province without kabaka`s agreement. which is guided in this case by the majority of votes on its original council.

At the request of Sir Gerald Portal, Alfred Tucker, Bishop of East Africa and later Bishop of Uganda, asked the British authorities to take control of Uganda. [2] On 29 May 1893, a contract between Portal and Kabaka Mwanga secured Uganda as a British protectorate. On August 27, 1894, Mwanga was forced to sign another contract with Colonel H.E. Colvile, who favoured the conventional acquisition of the territory. [3] Although the treaties of 1893 and 1894 were concluded because Uganda, as defined by the Berlin Conference, stumbled upon the British sphere of influence, Britain did not have the sanctity of traditional leaders and their peoples. It was important that an agreement be reached, contrary to a treaty, so that British domination would become de jure and not de facto. [3] Officials of the Kingdom.